ISLAMABAD, Jan 22 (APP):Pakistan and India will have to settle their territorial disputes on their own through dialogue and strong political will for attaining durable solution of longstanding Kashmir dispute.

This was stated by German Ambassador to Pakistan, Dr. Bernhard Schlagheck and French Ambassador to Pakistan, Dr. Marc Barety during a question and answer session after delivering a lecture at National University of Science and Technology (NUST).

The lecture on “German-French friendship as the Ground for Effective Multilateralism” was held to mark the signing of the Franco-German friendship treaty of January 22, 1963.
The ambassadors stated, “International community has been raising its voice against human rights violations in Occupied Kashmir, however both the parties (India and Pakistan) have to bring this issue to a logical conclusion through dialogue and political will to establish peace in the region”.

Dr. Marc Barety stressed that “We are mindful of the situation in occupied Kashmir and our head of states have conveyed their concerns to Prime Minister Narendar Moodi. You cannot expect international community to solve your territorial dispute however the thing which is direly needed from both sides is strong political will”.

He termed opening of Kartarpur Corridor by Prime Minister Imran Khan as a big confidence building measure from Pakistan’s side and such actions could pave the way for a meaningful dialogue between Pakistan and India.

Dr. Barety said the major cities of Pakistan and India were confronted with the issue of smog which could cause serious health hazards.

“Instead of blaming each other for causing smog, both the countries must resolve such issues which are affecting citizens across the border, through discussion”.

To another question, the French ambassadors said rising Islamophobia in Europe was due to misconceptions and lack of awareness among the citizens.

Interfaith dialogue at international level and comparative study of different religions was imperative for removing misconceptions about religions and promoting tolerance, he stressed.

Both the ambassadors emphasized that the global issues including climate change and others could not be addressed by single country so peaceful relations between different countries was dispensable for collective benefits of all.

They informed that France and Germany were enjoying good relations on many fronts including political, defense and cultural due to many similarities.

Both the ambassadors briefed the students and other audience about the historical importance of the Franco-German Friendship Treaty.

They informed that this treaty was all about friendship between France and West Germany to establish a new foundation for relations that ended centuries of rivalry.

A large number of students, faculty members and officials of NUST attended the lecture arranged at School of Social Sciences and Humanities (S3H).