Trump sets record low 2nd quarter job approval: Gallup poll

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NEW YORK, July 23 (APP): President Donald Trump’s average approval
rating in the second quarter of 2017 was the lowest of any American president’s approval rating since Gallup began tracking the number in 1945, according to a new poll.
A Gallup poll found that President Trump’s average approval rating for
the second quarter of 2017 (April 20 to July 19) was 38.8 percent, which is lower than any other president during a comparable period in their term.
That’s a decrease from Trump’s first-quarter approval rating, which
averaged at 41 percent according to Gallup. His rating was the lowest first-quarter approval rating of any president since Gallup started recording.
The next lowest second-quarter approval rating for a president belonged
to President Bill Clinton, who averaged an approval rating of 44 percent during this period in his first term.
According to the poll, most presidents were still enjoying the
“honeymoon” phase of their presidencies during this period of their first terms, with historically high approval ratings. Presidents John Kennedy and Dwight Eisenhower both enjoyed approval ratings above 70 percent during the second quarter of their first terms, while President George W. Bush hovered around 55 percent.
Trump’s predecessor, President Barack Obama, enjoyed an approval rating
of 62 percent during this period of his first term. Trump’s approval rating, compared to his predecessors, is extremely polarized.
President Trump is viewed favourably by just 8 percent of Democrats,
compared to 34 percent of independents and 85 percent of Republicans. That’s compared to a 26 percent approval rating among Republicans for President Obama’s second quarter, and a 29 percent approval rating from Democrats for President George W. Bush’s second quarter.
Overall, this quarter of Trump’s presidency ranks 250th out of 287
presidential quarters measured by Gallup since 1945.
Gallup’s second-quarter poll was conducted by landline and cellphone
from April 20 to July 19 with a random sample of 52,765 adults. The margin of error is +/- 1 percentage point.